1. Rummy 500 Online
  2. Rummy 500 Card Game Rules - How To Play Rummy 500

Ultimate Guide to Rummy (aka 'Rum')

Rummy 500 is the BEST Rummy game created for Windows. Rummy 500 offers four levels of difficulty, four unique game modes as well as extensive statistics tracking. It is an unparalleled game play. Rummy 500 is the BEST Rummy game created for Kindle Fire. Rummy 500 offers four levels of difficulty, 5 unique game modes as well as extensive statistics tracking. It is an unparalleled game play experience! Now with Facebook integration! To lay matched number sets of 3 or 4 and/or sequences of 3 or more cards of the same suit to be the first player to obtain 500 total net points.

Rummy is one of the most popular classic card games in the world. Often referred to as 'basic rummy” or 'traditional rummy,” or just 'Rum,' it's easy to learn and play once you get the hang of it. Though it's a simple game, playing rummy is exciting and there's a decent amount of skill involved.

Play Multiplayer Rummy 500 Online The Deck and Dealing. Rummy 500 uses a standard deck, plus 2 jokers. Each player is dealt a hand of 7 cards. The remaining cards become the draw pile. To begin play, a card is played from the draw pile face up into the discard pile. Rummy 500 is played by two people with the standard 52-card pack. Each player receives a hand of 13 cards, and the rest of the pack is placed face down; this is the stock. The top card of the stock is turned up and placed beside the stock in a discard pile.

How to Play Rummy: Rules & More

Players and Decks

Rummy is played with 2-6 players. It is played with a standard 52-card deck and aces are low.

Dealing

Players take turns dealing when playing a two-player game. When playing with three or more players, whose turn it is to deal rotates clockwise every round. The player who deals first is chosen at random and how many cards dealt to each player depends on the total number of players.

  • 2 players: 10 cards each
  • 3-4 players: 7 cards each
  • 5-6 players: 6 cards each

The dealer deals cards one by one then begins the discard pile by placing the following card face-up in the middle of the table. The dealer then places the rest of the deck face down next to it, forming the stock. Players then are permitted to look at their cards and sort them.

Goal

The goal of Rummy is simple: get rid of all your cards first.

Players can rid their hand of cards in three ways: they can meld, lay off, and discard.

  • To meld, a player takes multiple cards from his or her hand and places them face-up on the table. That combination of cards then stays there. Melding is the quickest way to get rid of cards.
  • Sets (sometimes called groups or books) and runs (sometimes called sequences) are the two valid types of melds in Rummy.
  • A set, book or group is 3 or 4 same-ranking cards.
    • Example: 10 of spades, 10 of diamonds and 10 of hearts
    • Example: 6 of clubs, 6 of spades, 6 of diamonds, and 6 of hearts
  • A run or sequence is 3+ consecutive cards of a matching suit. Consecutive cards of different suits do not constitute a valid sequence.
    • Example: 3 of spades, 4 of spades, and 5 of spades
    • Example: 9 of hearts, 10 of hearts, Jack of hearts, and Queen of hearts.
  • To lay off, add cards in your hand to already-existing melds.
    • Example: To a set of a 10 of spades, 10 of diamonds and 10 of hearts, a player could add a 10 of clubs.
    • Example: To a run of a 3 of spades, 4 of spades, and 5 of spades, a player could add a 2 of spades to the beginning or a 6 of spades to the end.
  • However, players may not rearrange any melds as they lay off.
    • Example: If a set of the 6 of clubs, 6 of spades, 6 of diamonds, and 6 of hearts and a run of the 3 of spades, 4 of spades, and 5 of spades are both on the table, a player couldn't move the 6 of spades from the set to the run in order to lay down a 7 of spades.
  • To discard, put one of your cards in your hand face-up on the discard pile. Players signal the end of every turn by getting rid of a card in this way.

Once a player has laid down all of his or her cards, the other player's cards are totaled up and added to the previous round's total. The rounds continue in this manner until one player reaches or goes over a target score and the rummy game is over. Then, the player with the lowest score wins.

Play

Players take turns, rotating clockwise, starting with the person to the left of the dealer. In a two-player game, players alternate turns.

Each turn includes the following, in this order:

  1. Drawing. Each player must start his or her turn by adding a card to his or her hand. Players can choose to take the first card from the discard pile or the stock pile.
  2. Melding. After beginning his or her turn by drawing a card, a player may lay a valid set or run down if he or she has one. Players can only put down one meld per turn (see Variations of Play). (Melding is optional)
  3. Laying off. After melding, players can add on to runs or sets already melded by any player. Players can lay off as many cards per turn as they'd like. Laying off is optional as well.
  4. Discarding. To signal that his or her turn is over, a player must discard a card from his or her hand to the discard pile. If a player picked up the card from the discard pile at the beginning of his or her turn, that player may not discard the same card in the same turn.

When the stock runs out, the discard pile is shuffled, turned face-down and the top card is turned face up next to it. Play continues. (See Variations of Play for alternate practices)

The round immediately ends when a player gets rid of all cards in his or her hand, or 'goes out.” That player wins the round.

Scoring

Once the round ends with a player going out, total up the other players' cards as follows:

  • Kings, Queens, Jacks, and 10s: 10 points
  • Number cards: face value
  • Aces: 1 point

The total value of the cards left in each losing player's hand is recorded and added to the previous round's total. The points are penalty points.

When any player reaches a previously agreed upon target score (often 100), the player with the lowest score wins. (See Variations of Play for other scoring options)

Strategy

Here are some tips and tricks for how to win Rummy:

  • Get rid of face cards and other high-value cards. If you can, do so early on in the game. If not, at least do so towards the end when you notice that your opponent is about to run out of cards. This means you'll run your own score up less.
  • Mathematically, it's easier to make a run than it is to get 3 of a kind. So if you're forced to discard either a card that could later form a run or one that could be part of a set, it's better to discard one that could later form a set.
  • Pay attention to what your opponent does. If he or she grabs a 10 of spades from the deck, you can bet that they probably either have a 10 already or are trying to complete a run of spades. Do your best to block them from getting rid of their cards!
  • Keep in mind that a run can have more than 3 cards in a row. Sometimes, the best way to get rid of cards fast is to form a 5- or 6-card run.

These are just the basics. For more in depth strategy of Rummy, check out White Knuckle.

Variations of Rummy

Looking to mix things up a bit? Here are some alternative house rules you can use. Be sure to discuss and decide upon any variations among fellow players before starting a game.

Set Number of Rounds

Instead of playing to a target score, players can decide to play to a set number of rounds. In this case, the player with the least amount of points after the set number of hands is the winner.

More than One Meld

Some play that players are allowed to lay down any number of melds during each turn. This is a very common variation; be sure that all players are on the same page about how many melds can be played during each turn before beginning a game.

Many also give a player bonus points if he or she goes out in one turn or 'going rummy,” as they call it. When a player 'goes rummy,' the hand's score is doubled.

Laying Off Before Melding

Some don't allow a player to lay off cards until he or she has laid down a meld. This is also a very common variation.

Aces High

The standard rules dictate that aces are only low. Hence, a run of Ace, 2, 3 would count, but a run of Queen, King, Ace wouldn't. Some let aces count as either low or high. When this rule is implemented, aces count for 15 points rather than 1 point, since they're more useful.

Even when this rule is implemented, aces can't be both high and low at the same time, such as in a King, Ace, 2 run. (Some allow these sort of runs, but it's rare)

Jokers

Standard Rummy doesn't use jokers. Some play that jokers can be used as wild cards that can replace any other card to form sets and sequences. When this rule is implemented, jokers are valued at 15 points and can be used by other players once they're on the table.

Discard Last

Some require players to discard a card even at the end of their last turn. Playing with this rule, a player wouldn't be permitted to meld or lay off all of his or her cards since he or she couldn't finish by discarding one.

Reusing Discard Pile

In old rummy rules, the discard pile isn't supposed to be shuffled before being reused as stock. However, this version of play isn't very fair because without a shuffle, any player who can memorize the discarded cards in order will have a clear advantage. Due to this, most card game books now recommend shuffling the pile before continuing play.

In both instances, using the discard pile as new stock over and over has other disadvantages. If each player hoards cards that other players want, each player could draw from the pile and discard the card he or she just drew. Theoretically, this sort of game could go on forever. To avoid that sort of repetition, players might consider limiting how many times they reshuffle the discard pile per round.

The discard pile is never reused In a variation of rummy called block rummy. Once the stock pile runs out, the game is over and all players score their remaining cards.

Scoring

In a common variation of traditional rummy, only the winner scores points after each round. The winner then gets the total number of points from all the cards in the hands of the losing players. When playing this way, the game still ends once a player reaches a target score. The player who reaches it wins the game.

Others play that the winner wins real cash from the losers according to how many points they each have in his or her hand. When playing this way, the game would end after an agreed-upon number of rounds instead of once a certain score is reached.

Glossary of Terms

Block rummy: a variation of rummy in which the discard pile is never reused

Book: 3 or 4 same-ranking cards. Example: 10 of spades, 10 of diamonds and 10 of hearts. One of two types of melds in rummy. Also called a group or set.

Discard: to play a card from your hand on top of the discard pile, signaling the end of a turn.

Gin rummy: a popular version of rummy played with two people. Often confused with traditional rummy.

Go out: To get rid of the last card in your hand, to win and end a round

Go rummy: Going out in a single turn by melding or laying off an entire hand.

Group: 3 or 4 same-ranking cards. Example: 10 of spades, 10 of diamonds and 10 of hearts. One of two types of melds in Rummy. Also called a book or set.

Indian rummy: a popular version of rummy from India played with two decks and wild cards.

Lay off: to add one or more cards from your hand to an already-existing meld

Meld: to place multiple cards from your hand face-up on the table. There are two types of acceptable melds in rummy: sets (also called books and groups) and runs (also called sequences).

Rummy 500: a popular version of rummy in which players play to 500 and score according to cards showing and cards in hand

Run: 3+ consecutive cards of a matching suit. Example: 3 of spades, 4 of spades, and 5 of spades. Also called a sequence.

Sequence: 3+ consecutive cards of a matching suit. Example: 3 of spades, 4 of spades, and 5 of spades. Also called a run.

Set: 3 or 4 same-ranking cards. Example: 10 of spades, 10 of diamonds and 10 of hearts. One of two types of melds in Rummy. Also called a book or group.

Stock: the face-down pile from which players can draw a card at the beginning of each turn

If you get bored here, we have plenty of other games to play! Maybe go play the card game hearts or the card game spades or the card game solitaire!

500 Rum
OriginUnited States
Alternative namesPinochle rummy, Michigan rummy
TypeMatching
Players2-8
3-5 (best)
Skills requiredAttention
Cards52-54 for 2-4 players (optional jokers)
104-108 for 5-8 players
DeckAnglo-American
PlayClockwise
Card rank (highest first)A K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 (A)
Playing time20 min.
Related games
Rummy, Canasta, Treppenrommé

500 rum, also called pinochle rummy, Michigan rummy, Persian rummy, rummy 500 or 500 rummy, is a popular variant of rummy.[1] The game of canasta and several other games are believed to have developed from this popular form of rummy.[2][3][4][5][6] The distinctive feature of 500 rum is that each player scores the value of the sets or cards they meld. It may be played by 2 to 8 players, but it is best for 3 to 5.

The term Michigan rummy may also refer to an unrelated game, very similar to the Canadian Rummoli (both sharing traits with the much older Poch), involving a playing board, chips, and accumulated pots that are awarded to players who play certain cards.[7]

Rules[edit]

The cards and dealing[edit]

500 rum is played using a standard French deck and can use 52 cards, or 53-54 cards including one or two jokers. When playing with 5 or more players, two decks of cards should be used with a total of 104-108 cards.

The players draw for deal, low dealing first. Ace is the lowest card in the draw. The dealer shuffles, and the player to the right cuts. The dealer completes the cut and deals cards one at a time to each player face down, clockwise starting at the dealers left. The number of cards dealt depends on the number of players.

Number of playersNumber of cards dealt
2 players13 cards
3 or more7 cards

The remaining cards are placed in a single pile face down between the players, forming the stock. The top card of the stock is turned face up and placed besides the stock to start the discard pile. As play continues any cards added to the discard pile are placed face up on top of any cards already in the discard pile. The discard pile should be slightly spread, so that players can readily see all the cards in it. Players are permitted to move the cards in the discard pile to view the cards, but may not change the order of the discard pile. After a round is complete, the next player to the left becomes the dealer.

In one variation, the discard pile is started by dealing one extra card face down to the player on the dealers left, who can then choose any card from their hand to place face up besides the stock to start the discard pile. The player that wins the round then becomes the dealer in the next round.

Game play[edit]

The object of the game is to score points as in regular rummy by laying down or laying off cards, initially in groups of matching cards known as melds, with a meld consisting of either: 3 or 4 cards of the same rank (e.g. 888 or 8888) called a set; or in sequences of three or more cards of the same suit (e.g. 8910) called a run. One variation of the game requires that laying down a run can only be done starting with four or more cards of the same suit (e.g. 78910).

Aces can be played as either a high card or a low card, meaning that they may be played after a king as a high card (e.g. QKA) or before a two as a low card (e.g. A23). Going 'around the corner' means that Ace is allowed to be both high and low in the same run (e.g. QKA2). If going around the corner is not allowed, Q-K-A and 2-3-4 must be separate runs.

Each player in turn, beginning with the player to the left of the dealer, may draw either the top card of the stock or any card from the discard pile. Once a card is picked up, either from the stock or the discard pile, it is final and no other cards may be picked up. However, there are two conditions when drawing a card from the discard pile:

  1. The player must take all the cards on top of (or discarded after) the selected card.
  2. The selected card so drawn must immediately be used, either by laying it down in a meld or by laying it off on a meld already on the table if permitted.

When drawing a card from the discard pile any remaining cards taken with the card drawn from the discard pile may be either melded in the same turn or simply added to the player's hand. Also, multiple cards picked up from the discard pile are left out until the selected card is played in an acceptable manner.

During a players turn, after drawing but before discarding, they may lay down any meld of matching cards, or may lay off any cards that match a meld or cards that have already been played. A player may lay down a single card or pairs of cards, but only if they match cards that have already been played. For example, a player may lay down a single card (e.g. 7) on either a set that has already been laid down (e.g. 777), or a run or part of a run that has already been laid down (e.g. 8910 or 89). A player may also lay down a pair of cards in sequence of the same suit on a run or part of a run that has already been laid down (e.g. lay down the 67 on a run of 8910 or 89 previously laid down).

Cards that are laid down or laid off are kept spread out on the table in front of the player, visible to other players. The player ends his turn by discarding a single card from his hand to the discard pile.

Players are usually only permitted to lay down cards when it is their turn, after drawing but before discarding. In a variation, players may put down melds or matching cards on other people's turns. The round is not over until one of the players puts down their last card, so with this variation a player can put down a meld when ever they want, until that last card is down.

If jokers are used in the game, they are treated as wild cards and can represent any card the player chooses even if that card is already used in another meld.

The round is over when one player has no cards in his or her hand and either by melding or laying off all cards or when there are no cards left in the stock pile. Players typically receive no bonus for finishing first. Microsoft solitaire online.

Discarding[edit]

Rummy 500 Online

When picking up from the discard pile you cannot pick up just to play a single card on a meld or other cards that have already been laid down, sometimes referred to as 'picking up to hit'. You may only pick up from the discarding pile if you were to put down a meld consisting of 3 or more cards including the card that was picked up.

In one variation, a player may pick up from the discard pile to play a single card or pair of cards on a meld or other cards that have already been laid down by any of the players. In another variation, a player may pick up only the top card from the discard pile and keep it in their hand without immediately playing it.[1]

If not able to discard due to a lack of cards, a player must pickup two cards of which one must be discarded

Scoring[edit]

Face cards count as 10 as does the 10 card. A-9 are 5 points, unless the Ace is used high, when it is 15. Jokers count as 15 points.

In order to begin scoring all players must lay no less than 30 points for their first score.

When any player discards the last card in their hand, the play immediately ends. Each player's score is then figured as follows: The player is credited with the point value of all cards that he has showing on the table. From this figure is subtracted the point value of all cards remaining in his hand. The difference is added or subtracted from their score, as the case may be.

If the cards they have shown total 85 points, and the cards left in their hand total 90 points, 5 points are subtracted from their previous net score. If the drawing pile runs out of cards and nobody is able to make a play, then the hand ends and nobody deducts the score from their hand.

The first player whose score reaches +500 wins the game. If two or more players reach 500 on the same hand, the one with the highest score is the winner.

Modified scoring systems[edit]

These additional or alternate rules have been put in to simplify scoring and speed up games. Point variants for Aces change the game dynamic somewhat as players may be more or less likely to reveal and play them as a part of runs.

  • Aces count 15 no exceptions or variations.
  • Aces are worth 25.
  • Aces played high are worth 15 except in the case where a single player plays a 4-of-a-kind Ace meld, in which case the meld is worth 100 points (25/ea.).
  • Aces can be allowed to 'go-around' in order to speed up games; thus allowing a meld of K-A-2.
  • All other cards are worth 5 points.
  • If preferred, all of these scores may be divided by five and the game played to 100.

Boathouse rule[edit]

Some rummy players play that any player must discard on the turn in which they go out. (A completed turn includes a discard in most variations of Rummy 500, and every turn, even the final turn, is not considered complete without a pile discard). This is often considered standard rules for Rummy.

For example, if a player held a hand of two 3's and picked up another 3, this player would be unable to go out as they would not have a discard. This is a variant of standard play and should be opted upon before gameplay begins.

Also, if the stock is finished then players may continue to draw from the pile only so long as they are able and willing to do so. Otherwise, the hand is finished with all cards in each player's hand counting against them. This is also normally standard. However some play the alternative that the cards should be reshuffled, and play should continue. Another alternative with a depleted stock is for play to continue, with players discarding after each turn until one of the players goes out.

Some variations require that the player must draw two cards from the stock pile. This variation is played as 'Boathouse Rum' in Best of Card Games for Windows 95 and Card Hero for Windows 8

Add opponent's hand rule[edit]

Instead of players subtracting their remaining totals when play is finished, they add the values in their hands to the total of the player who went out. If nobody has gone out when the stock is depleted (see Boathouse rule):

  • With two players, or two partnerships: add opponent's remainder to your score.
  • With more than two players: do not add any totals.
  • Alternatively, continue play with a discard after each turn until one of the players goes out.

This again, is meant to speed up the game. Also when one player plays his last card, the other player reserves the chance to add any of his deadwood cards to his opponent's melds.

Variations[edit]

Dealer's gambit[edit]

This game is the same as 500 Rum, with the following exceptions. The pack is 54 cards: the standard 52 cards plus two jokers. Some people play with 56 cards, including four jokers. Unlike ordinary rummy, dealing is always rotated anti-clockwise.

At the beginning of each deal one joker is removed from the pack. After shuffling and dealing that joker is placed face-up at the side of the pack closest to the dealer. This is the 'dealers joker' and may be used at any time in the game by the dealer, unless it has been 'blocked' [see below] by another player's joker. The second joker is shuffled and dealt with the rest of the cards.

After dealing but before any of the players look at their cards the dealer must nominate the effect of the jokers for that hand. The dealer may nominate the joker to do one of the following:

  1. Wild card. The joker may be used as a wild card in any set or sequence. The wild joker is worth zero points.
  2. Double. The joker doubles the value of any set. The joker is placed face up over any meld, whilst it is being melded. Once the joker has been added to the meld, that set is 'sealed' and no further cards can laid off onto it.
  3. The joker is used to 'split' the discard pile from either side of the card selected. Those cards on the inside of the split are then removed from the game for the remainder of that hand. Those cards on the outside of the split are added to the players hand. As per normal the selected card must be used immediately either by laying it down in a set or by laying it off on a set already on the table.

The dealer's joker can be 'blocked' at any time in the game by placing another joker face down over it. If the dealer's joker is so blocked it may not be used by the dealer for the remainder of that hand.

Jokers have a zero value if still in a players hand at the end of the turn. There are no penalties for not using the jokers.

Rummy

Each joker nomination may be used strategically by the dealer to improve their position or undermine that of other players. As a result, this is a highly strategic variant of the game which may result in long games with significant fluctuations in the score. As a result, some people only play to a smaller score of 250 points.

Partnership 500 rum[edit]

This game is the same as 500 rum, with the following exceptions.

Rummy 500 Card Game Rules - How To Play Rummy 500

Four players are organized into two teams of two players each, with partners facing each other across the table. The rules are exactly as in 500 rum, except the partners may play off on each other's matched sets and sequences in an effort to go out as quickly as possible. When any player goes out, the play ends and the score of each partnership is figured as a unit. The game is over when either side reaches +500. The team with the highest score over 500 wins, even if a team goes out first.

Persian rummy[edit]

The game is the same as partnership 500 rum, with the following exceptions, and the pack is 56 cards: the standard 52 cards plus four jokers.

Each joker counts as 20 points, and jokers may not be used in sequences or as wild cards, but only in groups of three or four jokers. Any meld of four, laid down all at once, counts double its face value. Thus, four jokers laid down together count 160; three jokers laid down count 60, and the fourth joker when added counts only 20 more. Four 6s put down together count 48, but three 6s count only 18, and the fourth 6 adds only 6 points. If a player gets rid of all his cards, his side scores a bonus of 25.

A game ends after two deals. The side with the best score receives a bonus of 50 points and wins the difference between its final score and the opponents' score.

Rummy[edit]

If a player discards a card that plays into any match set or sequence already laid-off on the table then other players may call-out 'Rum'. The first player to call 'Rum' may only take the discarded card and must lay-off it on the table in front of them in their laid-off cards area. They may not combine it with cards in their hand to create a new match set or sequence.

7-card straight[edit]

If a player lays down a 7-card straight and then discards his last card, he is awarded 500 points. This is known as the 'Rummy Master's Hand'.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ ab'500 Rum', Pagat.com (Card Game Rules).
  2. ^Carlisle, Rodney P. (2009). Encyclopedia of Play in Today's Society, Volume 1, p.615. SAGE. ISBN9781412966702. 'Canasta developed from 500 Rum.'
  3. ^Morehead, Albert Hodges and Hoyle, Edmond; eds. (1991). The New Complete Hoyle, Revised: The Authoritative Guide to the Official Rules of All Popular Games of Skill and Chance, p.70. Doubleday. ISBN9780385249621. 'This [500 Rummy] is also called Pinochle Rummy, and its family includes the popular games of Canasta, Samba, Persian Rummy, Michigan Rum, and Oklahoma.'
  4. ^Spadaccini, Stephanie (2005). The Big Book of Rules, unpaginated. Penguin. ISBN9781440626883. '500 Rum: A direct descendant of basic rummy, and an ancestor of Canasta.'
  5. ^Root, William S. (2016). Fun With Games of Rummy, unpaginated. Read. ISBN9781473356696. '500 Rum: From this popular form of Rummy have developed the new games of Canasta and Oklahoma; also Persian Rummy.'
  6. ^Morehead, Albert H.; Mott-Smith, Geoffrey; and Morehead, Philip D. (2001). Hoyle's Rules of Games, unpaginated. Penguin. ISBN9781101100233. 'Canasta is the culmination of many minor features tacked onto Five Hundred Rum.' One direction of conquain variations, 'emphasize melding, leading to Five Hundred Rum, Canasta, Samba, etc.'
  7. ^'Tripoli - Card Game Rules'. www.pagat.com.

External links[edit]

  • Play Multiplayer Rummy 500 Online with 2-7 players on any variation.
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